Elements Of Progress
Aristocracy, Freedom, Conservatism & Abolitionism

 

1863

 

by Phineas Parkhurst Quimby

 

The elements of political parties are the agents of wisdom; unintelligent and irresponsible in what they do. A child contains them all. Beginning as a blank, its first development is aristocracy; or a desire to be free, itself, and rule others. The next is to be free from all arbitrary restraint. These, acting together, bring out another element called “conservatism” and “reason.” Neither of these is intelligent. The child and the brute alike contain aristocracy and freedom; for they are the action and reaction of the simplest capacity.

Two animals, when first placed together, commence to fight, simply to see who will be master. At length one is overpowered and submits to the superior. The conquered becomes the slave, and in him commences the element of abolitionism. The desire to throw off the yoke of servitude makes him envious, fretful and often rebellious, until he has either gained his freedom or become submissive in slavery. He then loses his bold, defiant appearance and becomes dull and depressed.

Living in these elements of master and slave, animals and birds leave their oppressors and go where they can enjoy their freedom. This discord is always working to bring about emigration in the animal kingdom, so that the whole earth shall be peopled and the design of creation be fulfilled. Man, to a certain extent, is governed in the same way. His first act is to rule, and his oppression destroys freedom and causes emigration. Yet, when prepared to receive it, he is also subject to a higher element called science.

Every element in nature exists in man, but he believes them to be intelligent. Heat and cold cause expansion and contraction in nature. In man, they are found under the names of tyranny and freedom, and are thought to contain wisdom. In politics, their names are anti- and pro-slavery; and in religion, Unitarianism and Calvinism. In nature, these elements act as follows. The cold lays its icy hand on the earth, commanding the soil to cease producing and the light and warmth of the sun to be shut off. Then heat is held by the hand of ice, and life is extinguished in death, till heat, which cannot be long confined, commences to expand. Both are now at work; one to hold the other and the other to keep from being held.

To show how they act in man, I must illustrate by children. When two children come together, the first element excited is aristocracy. Their combativeness is aroused, and they contend for the mastery of each other. Finally it is received; then the aristocracy of the conqueror rises in its might, and the vanquished is bound. The slave now develops the abolitionist element and seeks to free itself from the arbitrary rule of the other. Again they quarrel, and in their struggle, the parent interferes, introducing a fourth element, conservatism.

Here commences reason in man. Conservatism, assuming to know more than the combatants, reasons with them; and as it expands, it takes possession of both, regulating and equalizing their position towards each other. Aristocracy, unwilling to be on an equality with freedom, seeks means to gain some advantage; but conservatism, holding the balance of power, checks the attempt. At length, it succeeds in encroaching, and then it declares war with freedom to get possession of the masses.

The masses (or democracy) is the lowest form of freedom, and the leaders who constitute the arbitrary power try, by argument and falsehood, to gain the influence of the masses, who are the strength of political parties. The radical aristocracy, having no principle and only a name, appeal to the democracy in one way; while the more liberal party address themselves to a higher state of mind. The former, having no higher gain than political power, labor to appear the friends of the people and are very liberal in certain rights, when in reality they are forging bands for their degradation.

These same elements are seen acting upon man in disease. But freedom, having no party, the leaders of aristocracy (the medical faculty) decide on the means to be used to keep the democracy (or man) in their power. So they quarrel about the different modes of practice with as much bitterness as political demagogues.

All admit disease, as leaders admit the necessity of two parties; and hence the necessity of doctors. And they, through their belief in disease, rule the people by their opinions, as much as politicians control the people by political craft. The masses cannot believe that doctors are of no use, for so long as they admit disease, they will take medicine. Just so in politics. The necessity of two opposite parties make the people believe in their leader, and thus they become the tool of politicians.

The leaders of all sects and parties rule the people, for aristocracy always rules democracy in religion, politics and disease. Aristocracy is represented in disease; freedom in health, and man is democracy (or the element to be acted upon). Creeds, parties and beliefs start up aristocracy, and all have the effect to keep freedom down. Having come out from both elements, I will address myself to conservatism, for that contains the other two and can be guided by wisdom; while the other two cannot be immediately acted upon by wisdom.

Every person contains these three elements in various combinations. I will illustrate these by a steam boat. The steam acting on the piston, and the ship struggling to be free, represents freedom. The mooring is aristocracy; and he who cuts the cable is the conservative element, under the direction of freedom. Then freedom bounds into the ocean of progression, guided by the science of God in the captain (or pilot).

Here are the three. Two contain no intelligence, yet they act in harmony with the principles of wisdom. The third has knowledge of the other two and can be guided by wisdom; still it is ignorant how wisdom combines the three. All will admit that neither the ship nor the steam contained intelligence; and the same with the mooring, but the man who, obeying orders, looses the ship and lets her go is of a higher order.

These three were in action when Jesus appeared. Men, like barges, were moored on the sea of idolatry and superstition; some, like Paul, driven by the wind of conservatism toward the rocks of bigotry; while others, drifting towards the ocean of wisdom, sought to be free. Then amidst the fury of the struggle, they heard a voice say to the winds and waves, “Be still.” And there was a calm, and wisdom took possession of their barges.

Every person is like a vessel governed by some intelligence superior to the elements of the vessel. A sick man is like a vessel in a fog, with the wind in shore and she in danger of going onto the rocks. He is moored in his belief, which is a sea of danger. The doctor comes to assist him out of the difficulty and to start him on the road to health; as a pilot goes on board ship to put her out to sea. Sitting by him, he feels his pulse to find how much confidence he has in getting him out of his difficulty. He asks his symptoms, and then, looking very wise, he tells him he is in very great danger, and great care and attention must be used to prevent the disease from spreading; just as a pilot would give a captain a detailed account of the dangers and difficulties he must meet in going to sea.

The doctor then leaves the patient with many orders and much medicine to his belief. The patient takes the opinion into his mind and the medicine into his body, and they both result in a convulsion of the latter. The ship sails according to the direction of the pilot, and the first thing heard is, “Breakers ahead!” and then, “All hands to the pump!” Having pumped out the water, she is tossed and rocked by the gale, till the wind dies away, and a dead calm follows. The voyage is given up, till the ship is repaired. The sick man, controlled by the knowledge of the doctor, shows changes and symptoms; which are doctored as fast as they appear, till all remedies fail. A complete prostration ensues, and he is left to nature, that he may recuperate. A dissatisfaction is felt among the friends of the sick, and some are bold enough to say, “If he had never employed a doctor, he would not be in the state he is.”

A council is held, and I am sent for. Not that they have any confidence in my scientific knowledge, but they consider me more as an agent of nature than the physicians. They employ me as the captain employs a mechanic to repair the bad effect of the breaches and strains. When I come, I find, by the man, that his real trouble is in his mind. Believing himself to be in great danger, he sent for a doctor and told him his sufferings, and the doctor, ignorant of his trouble, brought him into his present state.

Here comes in my peculiar way of reasoning; to make him see that what I say is true. Medical authority admit that symptoms indicate a disease, and I know them to be wholly the effect of their belief and theory. So when I commence proving this truth, the aristocratic parties rally 'round disease with their various beliefs and opinions, and oppose the course I take, with every species of insult and contempt. This truth, by which I correct the sick of their errors and cure their disease, is hated by aristocracy, despised by freedom and laughed at by conservatism. Consequently, I am opposed by the whole world.

I have said that everyone contains the two opposite elements of tyranny and freedom. But few contain conservatism; for that is born of the other two and indicates a higher capacity. It can be changed and acted upon by wisdom, for it can reason and see sides to a question. Unlike the other two, it does not require physical force to control it. That is only necessary among the brutes, who, containing only the two first, bring forth an inferior element, which answers for conservatism, but is not refined enough to receive science.

Man is composed of five elements, tyranny and freedom, which are not intelligent; conservatism, which is capable of becoming a medium for intelligence; and science and wisdom, which act upon conservatism to develop man. Every person, by his acts and reason, shows which combination governs him. A man governed by aristocracy is governed by freedom; and his conservatism, containing more of the former than freedom, he will be set in his ways. He will give his opinion as truth, and pretending to liberal thinking, will bind himself with the fetters which he, himself, has forged. Such a man never reasons from principles, but always from creed (or party). He will have an excellent memory for his belief, but no appreciation of principles. Neither can he understand a scientific man, who reasons from the basis of wisdom; and independent of established opinions and facts, applies universal truths to all sorts of philosophy. For instance, the truth that all men are born free and equal, carried out by scientific reasoning, regardless of human interests, would show that oppression lives in obstructing freedom.

The mechanical powers, weight and velocity, are not capable, themselves, of intelligent action; but they work out a combined force, which is the power to be used and guided by a wisdom superior to itself. A stream of water with no obstructions represents the natural, undeveloped man (or the brute). Now let it be obstructed. Then the element of freedom, backed by pressure, struggles till the obstruction is removed. The idea “dead weight” (or blank) acts as a stumbling block; and when freedom (or motion) encounters it, one or the other must give way. Often both elements keep up an action, till the obstacle in the way of freedom is overcome. This holds good in all revolutions, and it has truly been said that revolutions never go backwards, for these antagonistic forces break down all opposition. They dissolve all matter, making it a simple element that can be condensed and dissolved by science. In philosophy, the obstacles are in the questions discussed.

Slavery is a stumbling block in the stream of progression. But the fountain of liberty will force the tide of public opinion through the wilderness of slavery, till every obstacle in its way is overcome. Like the waters of the Mississippi, it will overflow the land of slavery and sweep away everything opposing it. This is the action of the primary principles of nature. Now parties are agitated by the stream of liberty. And, as in the overflowing of a prairie, the fear of destruction rouses conservatism; which seeks to stop the tide of progression, or bank up the low places, so that the stream, in flowing, shall not desolate the whole country. Differences of opinion naturally arise as to the aim and result of the revolution. Some, seeing nothing but ruin, run from fear. Others throw themselves recklessly into the gulf and are carried along by the stream of progression; while others try to dam up the fountain, not thinking the reaction will overflow the dry land. And when the floods pass upon the obstruction, the stream bursts out, overflows and destroys all the inhabitants; which are slavish ideas. Then the water of freedom becomes calm, the storm is over, and peace is restored. This is a representation of man, as we see him. All nature is embraced in the working of these elements.

The power that gives direction is another principle. When it comes from their uniform action, it acts in harmony with itself; but when guided by a superior power from God, it becomes the spirit of man. It then contains life and reason; and herein commences the knowledge of man.

I have said that freedom is kept bound by tyranny. A war is the result, not that freedom makes war, but tyranny aims at oppressing freedom; and this brings out conservatism and introduces a higher power. Conservatism is not the higher power; it contains reason, but that is no part of it. It is a medium (or middle ground) where the higher and lower elements of man meet and show, by reason, their comparative force. Therefore science enters, but error always precedes it and misleads the mind.

Conservatism never fights. It dislikes commotion and cries, “Peace,” to the conflict of opposing parties. A person in whom conservatism is predominant is not impulsive, but lukewarm. He is satisfied with himself, cares not for the liberty of others and knows not if he is oppressed. Conservatism aims at harmony and employs various inventions to obtain it. Hence, differences of opinion arise and parties spring up. One, sympathizing with the lower part of man, appeals to aristocracy; while the other, belonging to the higher element, appeals to science. Every person contains the arguments of both, so each party, hoping to command the average opinions, invents false issues to satisfy conservatism that it is right.

This condition of things is well-illustrated by the present rebellion. Freedom can never make war; otherwise it binds itself and ceases to be freedom. But aristocracy, which lives by oppressing, makes war that it may live; and its life is its destruction. As freedom, like heat, expands, oppression seeks to subdue it. Therefore it requires more power, which it uses like a garment to cover its iniquity. And when freedom grows and occupies more space, oppression tries to cover it with its mantle, which is found to be too short.

Both now come into the domain of conservatism, and aristocracy demands more territory, that it may enlarge its bounds. Science opposes this, and a fight takes place. Then both parties set forth their arguments and issues to gain conservatism. Aristocracy assumes that slavery is a divine institution, and its destruction will involve the downfall of governments and societies. The opposite party denies that freedom was ever intended to be governed by aristocracy. But instead of settling this principle, false issues spring up which give another direction to their arguments. Aristocracy says that Liberty commenced the war, and they try to prove it in all they say.

If they succeed in convincing conservatism that this is the case, then every kind of deception will be used to make the party obnoxious to the people. So that when the rebellion is ended, they shall rally on this idea and can convince the people who pay the taxes that their trouble was brought upon them by the liberal party. But if the rebellion is put down by those who understand the real cause of the war, this very party who commenced the war, the slavery party, who try so hard to shirk out of the responsibility, is dead, as far as African slavery is concerned.

This same progress is carried out in man in the action of the medical theory. When a person is sick, the first thing done is to call a physician, who, being of the aristocracy, is the ruling element, which is slavery, and he favors disease (or rebellion). Having the fighting powers under his control, he employs them according to medical direction. Now as freedom from the medical faculty is spreading, the government uses every means to crush any attempt to free man from this cursed tyrant disease, which alone benefits the aristocracy and keeps the masses poor and sick to pay the taxes. New parties now come up, who try to divide the people. Under them, many desert their masters and declare themselves independent of all medical power. Yet, though they have worked out their own freedom, they believe in disease for others.

Now I introduce myself among the masses as having come out from all sects; therefore I am a target for all of them. Knowing my position, I do not, like those called reformers, destroy the law; but I appeal to the intelligence of the sick, without. I strike at its very root, and I destroy the foundation of disease. I assume the position that disease is not a divine creation; that its origin is not in principles of justice, love or any of the attributes of God, but that it is an invention of man in his error, and like all slavery, it is for the benefit of the aristocratic few.

I also affirm that man was made free and subject to no arbitrary laws; but that he has bound himself and enslaved the masses. The sick, like the masses, are held in bondage by the aristocracy. Not only do they submit to the yoke and consent to be led blindfold, but they even kiss the hand that has defrauded them of their native rights. To oppose this deception, I have to contend with great obstacles.

In the first place, all men who believe in disease admit a belief that disease is a punishment sent from God upon those who disobey some law. Consequently, all those who undertake to live free from law are in danger of punishment. Disease is a great advocate for law, when it does not prescribe restrictions on its power; just as those in favor of slavery believe in supporting the laws which seem to favor the rebellion. Law must be so framed that it will sustain slavery to gain their support. So it is with disease. All laws that uphold disease must be obeyed.

When sitting by the sick, I am a complete abolitionist, for I oppose all laws made to keep man well. This must seem to make one radical, but when understood, I am not so; but rather a conservative. The radical breaks down all law and obligation, leaving the people without principle or reason, and he wants to impose his belief on the world. To all such I am opposed. Then, of course, I am a radical. Jesus opposed radicals of every kind and urged the people to sustain the laws, while he warned them not to believe in the doctrines. As I have said, I never destroy the law. I destroy its foundation as an arbitrary power, and then it rests easily, where otherwise it bound.

I never tell a man that he imagines his sickness and only thinks himself diseased, when really he is not. According to this very truth I am trying to explain, disease is what follows an opinion. And when a man says he has the heart disease or liver complaint, I do not deny it, in one sense. I do not admit the disease and tell him he has not got it, but I affirm that the disease is in his belief, and his belief is in error. If he says, “I believe I have the heart disease,” then he tells what he really believes, and his feelings are the literal proof of his belief. This is the only way I reconcile the truth, which denies disease, with its real existence. But to acknowledge disease and deny the symptoms is to contradict myself.

Men take medical opinions as something existing outside of the minds, where all opinions originate; as though diseases were independent things, living by themselves. And doctors, admitting this, try to drive them away, but not to destroy them. They do not believe in annihilation. I do believe in the total annihilation of the wicked (or false) opinions. Therefore, I oppose all religious and moral laws which oppress the masses. Would I destroy all law and obligation that keeps society together? By no means. I would go as far as any man to sustain the laws. Still, I cannot believe them to be of God. And I will use all the means God has put into my power to expose hypocrisy and redeem man from the law; not by violence, but by teaching him the religion that will purify him from all errors, so that he may live in scientific truth; believing only in one loving and true God, who will render to everyone according to his acts.

To show more clearly how I oppose all laws, I will describe the course I have to take with a patient who has been made to believe by the doctors that he has the heart disease. If the patient believes the doctor, he believes himself guilty of disobeying some law whose punishment, in his case, is imprisonment in heart disease. I come to him, and by finding his prison, know what he is accused of; for every man is imprisoned in his belief, either under sentence or under suspicion of some offense.

I take the ground that God never made a belief. A belief is of man and is intended to satisfy him, instead of true wisdom. If God ever spake, he spoke the truth which liberated men and bound him with no obligations. When man speaks, he always tells a lie; that is, in explaining a phenomenon, he imposes a belief and invents opinions which blind people to truth. Science is the voice of God; opinions that of man. So when man speaks in his own knowledge, he gives an opinion; but when he tells a truth, that is of God.

Now man is under the law of men. And the science of God, having no place in him, he is condemned by his own laws, which are declared by those wise in their own conceit to be the laws of God; to oppose which is blasphemy. I do oppose them, and sometimes I meet with great opposition, for my mode of treatment, being entirely new, it is difficult to make myself understood. I do not work in a belief. I work on an element in man, susceptible to a wisdom that is invisible and unconscious to the natural man. To me, it contains the real man; it is the casket (or prison) of man's belief.

Our belief has two bodies, a natural and a spiritual one. I will use the same illustration in heart disease to bring them out. If the belief takes a visible form, and if after the patient dies the heart is found enlarged, this proves that he was killed by a disease. But if, on the other hand, the examination shows the heart to be unchanged, then the verdict is that he died of imagination.

To me the disease is the same in both cases, and it is a deception in either. We are affected, more or less, by a story which we hear, thinking we believe it. But if no effect follows our belief, it shows that we only admit it in our knowledge and do not form it in the mind. The mind, which receives impressions from matter, partakes of the earthly man; but it also receives impressions from the spiritual elements, which cannot be seen by the natural man, nor are they acknowledged by him, except as imagination. This is the condition of a person whom the world calls “dead.” The ideas of death, life and matter all die to the natural man when the body ceases to breathe, but to me that element that is acted upon by an unseen power contains man's senses, which are transferred from the visible form.

Every person is in this higher element where all the senses live, but their belief, like darkness, keeps them all their natural life in ignorance of it and in bondage through fear of death; for the element is completely under the control of our belief. If we believe in spirits, we can condense them into the form of our belief, and this we take as proof that there are spirits and are affected accordingly. The medical faculty, also by their belief, act on it when attached to the body. They, by their power over this medium, condense their belief into a disease and show the form to prove the truth of their assertions.

The trouble lies in our ignorance of this invisible element of matter, which is a medium for science to develop wisdom. As every idea of man emanates from the great fountain of wisdom, they are sown in this element, like seed in the ground, and come forth as the child of wisdom, whose mother material it clings to; as the plant clings to the mother earth, thinking that it contains life. This medium, being the offspring of freedom and slavery, the child looks upon them as his parents, and at first, it is guided by the chemical action of these forces. But as it grows in the wisdom of God, it casts off the two earthly elements and puts on that of wisdom.

This is not always done at death, for it represents progression, and that is not stayed by death. This element, I have before said, is what I work upon in the curing of disease; for disease is the disturbing of the three. Aristocracy, being the father, freedom (or the mother) wishes to rid herself of oppression; and thus comes the child in the element of conservatism, and this mingles with the wisdom of God. All these represent a garden in which the child of science is placed to control the brutal force of the two first elements. So the war is carried on in the natural element, but controlled by the higher.

Every person shows to the world the element which rules him by his acts to himself, in his belief. Freedom, which is God-like in man, like heat, will melt down the cold hand of oppression which tries to bind it. Thus a constant chemical action between the two is kept up, and this coming in contact with each forms that state of conservative heat, not too hot nor too cold, but a condition like summer, ready to produce the fruits of science; while the extremes of heat or cold are produced by false reasoning. This was the wilderness that Moses passed through on his journey from Egyptian darkness to the land of science.

The natural element of man is freedom, but in his ignorant state, it is a condition of darkness, filled by its enemy, tyranny; with countless terrors and superstitions intended to frighten man into subjection. Of this early condition, every man is a representative, inasmuch as he is in error and under the law. The land of error, being common property, everyone claims the right of exploring it. So some study opinions, and others become the apostles of freedom.

Man reasons from shadows and therefore sees everything reversed, so that his first premise, which is that oppression is the first step in progression, is false; for it is an element created by freedom. Freedom is motion, and motion creates resistance; so that resistance to progression is a natural result, like reaction. Man, in ignorance of this, admits these two elements and tries to believe them intelligent, and then, to him, progression becomes an enemy to oppression.

By false reasoning, men have taken elements for knowledge and try to fight against them through their blindness. All reasoning is based upon the false foundation that progression is wrong and dangerous, and it must be kept in check by an aristocracy, which thinks it has the power to say to the tide, “Thus far shall thou go and no further.” In opposition to this false mode of reasoning is freedom, which, expanding into liberty, creates an opposition that checks it, till it contracts to a certain extent. Still, the fire of freedom burns in the bosom of men, saying to the iron hand of slavery, "Stay your course," which is the working of the two elements.

Light is liberty; darkness is slavery. The aristocratic mind chooses darkness rather than light, because his thoughts are evil; while the scientific mind comes to the light to prove all things. They are like two hostile armies into which errors creep, like spies. Conservatism is when they press against each other and into which corruption is thrown by the commotion of these two opposing forces.

In this chaos (or purgatory), all political refuse is found, and here is where direction is given to both parties. Both claim to be friends to harmony; but by their acts, they are known. One class opposes progression; while the other opposes aristocracy. Each is ignorant of the true issue which they oppose. One fights against God and Liberty; the other fights against that party. Liberty requires no fighting. It is universal, and like a consuming fire, it will burn up every root and stubble that is thrown in its way. Checking it only creates more force. Like checking the power of steam while the fire is burning, it will burst out again with more force.

Let leaders and statesmen settle down on the fact that freedom is from a divine principle emanating from wisdom, then no monarch can say, “Thus far shall thou go and no further,” without being crushed. Then man, learning wisdom, will cease to fight against God. And he will lay down the weapons he has created to destroy himself. The false idea that to oppress is right and freedom wrong is the error which has caused all the wars since the world began. It has made disease popular.

Error has become God; ignorance bliss, and misery the common lot of all. It has spread all over the civilized world, and wisdom alone can see that when the field of politics is swept by the fire of freedom, its wicked generation must end. Like foxes of old, the political leaders will run through the field of slavery, destroying their own subsistence. And seeing what they have done, they will desert their parties and flee into a foreign land. Their fields will pass into the hands of those who, having silenced the noise of the cannon, will turn their weapons into plowshares and will cultivate the ground in the name of the one living and true principle of progression.

To apply the foregoing to the curing of disease, it is necessary to introduce a character higher than the elements I have mentioned, and one which they do not recognize. I call it a new mode of reasoning. It is the true and living wisdom of God manifested in this third susceptible element in man. Without father or mother, it is not born of slavery or freedom, but exists from everlasting to everlasting, without beginning or end. It has been likened unto the leaven that leaveneth the whole lump. It has been called the “Messiah” and the “bread of life.” David called it “wisdom” and prayed to it as the Good Shepherd.

It is that which every scientific man worships. This character is in the world, guiding the destinies of nations and individuals, and they know it not. To bring it to the understanding of man is to establish the kingdom of heaven on earth; and this causes all warfare, human and moral. Man's health and happiness depend on his knowledge of this character, which to him is a good shepherd. And his disease and misery come from his having fallen in with wolves who, fed by superstition, stand ready to kill the shepherd and devour the sheep. In other words, blind superstition stands ready to destroy every scientific truth as soon as it is born (or believed).

To know how this character enters man's house (or belief) is to see its hypocrisy and craft in argument, its cunning in reason. Follow me into the sick room of any patient, and there see this subtle enemy of mankind, hissing and turning the countenances into every shape and exhibiting every kind of hypocrisy. It may all be honest, for the devil may assume an angel's temper, and he is as honest as men are towards the sick. Listen to these human devils advocating disease in religion, politics and medicine, and see them loose their hold on man as I make war with them.

The first question I ask on entering a sick room is, “Are you sick?” The reply comes, not from the voice of wisdom, but from the officer, who holds the keys of life and death. “Yes.” He is very low and probably cannot stand it long, for his disease is of that character that it is past the power of man to heal. Only the Supreme Ruler can save him. This answer embodies the wisdom of its father, the devil, who has made all his children believe that disease was sent by God upon man to prepare him for a higher state. Having no respect for this hypocrisy, I open my batteries upon it and am answered by a shower of abuse, for the devil's philosophy has become as fashionable as secession at the South.

It is said that I do not believe there is any disease; that I set myself at defiance with divine institutions and am opposed to the laws of God, and various other accusations are made. Disease is the altar of the medical faculty. The priests prophesy falsely, and the doctors bear rule by their craft, and the people, believing it right, love to have it so.

Now when power and truth are united together by a principle of peace, they rush to arms, and a council is called. The sick are laid upon the altar as a sacrifice to their belief, and they argue and pray to God that he will not permit error to flourish; also that he has shown his power and mercy in visiting the sufferer with disease, so that he shall be prepared to enter the kingdom of heaven. Thus aristocracy is agreed that slavery is for the happiness of the slave, and the patient is sacrificed by false priests. In the presence of the multitudes, the parties arise; freedom lights the fire, and I listen to learn if, by their theory, the sacrifice can be offered and the patient saved.

They reason and offer opinions and wait. But the fire of truth burns not, and the victim lies wasting upon a bed, while the scriptures are searched to prove that they are doing the will of God. Finally patience is exhausted, and the sick one is given over to me, that is, the friends begin to put confidence in what I say. Now I commence to build my altar, and the first stone laid is the truth that disease is the work of Satan. I then finish with the stones from their altar, stating that the patient is sick according to their belief. Then, laying the patient on the altar to God, I cover him with the word (or arguments) and kindle the fire of truth (or show the absurdity of their reason). Their voices cry out, “Bind the leaders and cast them into prison, that they shall no longer deceive the people.” Thus Satan's kingdom is divided against itself. As man begins to reason from another starting point, different results are accomplished.

The false assertion that disease is in any way connected with God leads to slavery, which is opposed to every good thing. Slavery in mind (or matter) is of Satan. Science will explain it, so that man will free himself from the opinion of priest and doctor and will allow their laws to stand as a warning to all generations as they pass along through the world of progression. Then evil ideas, which once stood as truth, shall be as a valley of dry bones, hated by all who see them. This will be the fate of the leaders of all kinds of slavery, who have deceived the people through falsehood.

This truth, springing like a phoenix out of the ashes, has become a prince of peace, and he will establish his kingdom in the hearts of men. Then the devil, in the form of religious and medical teachers, will make war on the principle of freedom. Every artifice will be used to set the minds against science, and every false belief will be appealed to, in order to make a successful false issue.

For instance, certain political leaders say that if the North had done right, this rebellion might have been avoided. Beware of such reasoning. Remember that freedom never makes war, but Aristocracy always begins a quarrel. For if the reverse was true, then man could do evil, that good may come. But he who loves the truth says, “Let God be true and every man a liar.” In other words, admit that science is true and opinions false, and then no one can arrive at a truth by admitting an error.

To acknowledge slavery right is to allow an error that good may come. If the leaders can only establish the idea that the liberal party began the war, then everything will be brought up to make the Republicans responsible for the war. But if the truth is established that freedom is the natural condition of the mind, and to oppose it and make war against it is fighting against God and science, then every person will be very cautious how they speak against an institution that has caused so much bloodshed. Then a death-blow will be struck at its roots, and all that is heard is the gnashing of its teeth in the agonies of death; its friends scattered throughout all the civilized world as warnings to tyrants; and it will become a byword and reproach among nations, and here endeth African slavery.

White slavery (or disease) must go through the same process to meet its doom. The weapons will be reason, and the warfare will be carried on upon the platform of intelligence. Its opposers will say to the party in favor of freedom, “Go on, the people are too ignorant to listen to the words of wisdom. We have such a hold on the minds that they think their theory is as solid as a rock.” But when the wind of science blows upon it, while they are eating and drinking or talking and preaching their error, the storm will come, and they will be swept away down the streams of time into the gulf of despair. And like the swine, they will be swallowed up in the ocean of forgetfulness.

Before this takes place, men will doubt, reason and question. Opposition to the old faculty will spring up; different arguments will be used, till the idea that medicine must be used to cure disease is exploded. Parties spring up opposing drugs but believing in disease, and finally this sin will be denied. Then it will be a question to settle, “Who invented disease or began it?” And beware how you admit that it is from God, for this doctrine will be urged on the people. Abide by the truth that man is the inventor of the disease, as he is of African slavery.

P. P. Quimby

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